blue-author:

actressesofcolor:

This is not about an actress of color, but please vote against David O. Russell being included in #TIME100. If you are unaware, he admitted to sexually assaulting his transgender niece, and does not deserve any sort of praise or recognition. Reblog to spread the word!

.The subject matter of that second link is obvious from the text, but be advised, it is a very detailed account of physical violation of a type and context that many trans women will have direct experience with. I feel physically ill and very anxious—as one does when one is an unsafe environment—having read it. Proceed with caution.

blue-author:

actressesofcolor:

This is not about an actress of color, but please vote against David O. Russell being included in #TIME100. If you are unaware, he admitted to sexually assaulting his transgender niece, and does not deserve any sort of praise or recognition. Reblog to spread the word!

.The subject matter of that second link is obvious from the text, but be advised, it is a very detailed account of physical violation of a type and context that many trans women will have direct experience with. I feel physically ill and very anxious—as one does when one is an unsafe environment—having read it. Proceed with caution.

Despite the antireligious content of the Red seders, they were distinctly Jewish events, organized for Jews, by Jews, and, equally important, they were conducted in Yiddish. Even the building in which the event took place was frequently a former synagogue. Most Jews did not perceive these activities as anti-Jewish. They saw them as Soviet Jewish events, created for their entertainment, and also as traditional holidays. Even after the most successful Red seders, which were attended by large audiences, the majority would go home and celebrate traditional Passover seders. Furthermore, those who conducted the Red seder often hurried to conclude the event since their families were waiting for them at home to celebrate the traditional seder.

Anna Shternshis, Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, 1923-1939 (2006), p. 39.

More on Red Passover

(via sovietjewry)